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GeenStijl

Vulkanen. World Goatses

11 May 2009 / /


Picture showing an undersea volcano eruption about 10 to 12 kilometres (six to seven miles) off the Tongatapu coast of Tonga sending plumes of steam and smoke hundreds of metres into the air. Tonga's head geologist, Kelepi Mafi, said there was no apparent danger to residents of Nuku'alofa and others living on the main island of Tongatapu. Officials also said it may be related to a quake with a magnitude of 4.4 which struck last March 13 around 35 kilometres from the capital at a depth of nearly 150 kilometres. AFP PHOTO / LOTHAR SLABON


Picture dated March 18, 2008 showing an undersea volcano eruption about 10 to 12 kilometres (six to seven miles) off the Tongatapu coast of Tonga sending plumes of steam and smoke hundreds of metres into the air. Tonga's head geologist, Kelepi Mafi, said there was no apparent danger to residents of Nuku'alofa and others living on the main island of Tongatapu. Officials also said it may be related to a quake with a magnitude of 4.4 which struck last March 13 around 35 kilometres from the capital at a depth of nearly 150 kilometres. AFP PHOTO / LOTHAR SLABON / MATANGI TONGA



Picture dated March 18, 2008 showing an undersea volcano eruption about 10 to 12 kilometres (six to seven miles) off the Tongatapu coast of Tonga sending plumes of steam and smoke hundreds of metres into the air. Tonga's head geologist, Kelepi Mafi, said there was no apparent danger to residents of Nuku'alofa and others living on the main island of Tongatapu. Officials also said it may be related to a quake with a magnitude of 4.4 which struck last March 13 around 35 kilometres from the capital at a depth of nearly 150 kilometres. AFP PHOTO / LOTHAR SLABON / MATANGI TONGa



This March 21, 2009 handout image courtesy of the Alaska Volcano Observatory / US Geoligical Survey shows the top vent in the active Mount Redoubt Volcano in Alaska. Mount Redoubt is rumbling again and geologists at the Alaska Volcano Observatory increased the official alert level to red, when a major eruption is imminent, underway, or suspected with hazardous activity both on the ground and in the air. AFP PHOTO/HO/Cyrus READ/AVO/USGS



An aerial view of the crater of the mount Vesuvius volcano, is seen near the Italian city of Naples on March 31, 2009. Nearly 200 years after the destruction of the famed town of Pompei, mount Vesuvius is again threatening the surrounding Italian region. With a staggering array of measurement devices perched atop its crater continuously transmitting complex data 24-hours a day back to the Vesuvius observatory, experts aim to foresee any irregularities in the volcanoe's simmering state -- in 1944, an 11-day eruption killed 26 and displaced 1200, a fractional figure compared to the 30,000 fatalities of the Pompei eruption. AFP PHOTO / MARIO LAPORTA



Photograph made available by the Geophysical Institute (IG) of the National Politechnical School showing the Fernandina volcano on the island of the same name in the Ecuadorean Galapagos islands that has started a new eruption period according with information provided by IG on 11 April 2009. GALAPAGOS NATIONAL PARK



Photo shows a plume of ash from the Cleveland Volcano in Alaska made shortly after Expedition 13 astronaut Jeff Williams contacted the Alaska Volcano Observatory to report the activity. He took this photograph from the International Space Station. NASA



This May 5, 2009 image courtesy of the Alaska Volcano Observatory / US Geological Survey, shows a web cam shot of the Mount Redoubt volcano. Mount Redoubt volcano is likely to erupt again in the "coming days," the Alaska Volcano Observatory reported on May 5, 2009. Redoubt, which began belching steam in January, erupted in March, sending a cloud of ash and smoke across the sparsely populated surrounding area. The volcano has been largely quiet for the past month. However the observatory said in a statement Redoubt's lava dome was growing "increasingly unstable" and could explode at any time. Mount Redoubt is located on the western shore of the Cook Inlet, some 150 kilometers (90 miles) from Anchorage. AFP PHOTO/HO/AVO/USGS



A farmer removes dust from his ash-covered cow, Friday, 18 August 2006, in the town of Pillate, in central Ecuador. Officials say some 4,000 people living at the foot of the volcano Tungurahua have been evacuated and more than 20,000 hectares (50,000 acres) of farmland have been destroyed. EPA/Guillermo Legaria


Sinkhole in Israel. Not a vulcano, but nice enough.


Aerial view 05 December 2006 of a lava filled fumarole in the Dolomieu crater on the Fournaise range on the island of La RČunion. The volcano Piton de la Fournaise has been erupting since 30 August 2006. AFP PHOTO RICHARD BOUET



epa00952253 Tungurahua volcano, in the Andean middle of Ecuador, has threatened its neighbours this, Friday 9 March, with great explosions, after a seven month truce. The volcano's activity has increased in the last ten days with ash expulsions the towns of San Juan, Pillate y Choglontus. EPA/Jose Jacome



Aerial view taken 02 April 2007 of lava coming from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano burning vegetation and road in the Indian Ocean island of La Reunion. AFP PHOTO RICHARD BOUHET



This handout picture released February 5, 2008 by the European Space Agency taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA?s Mars Express orbiter shows a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) picture of Olympus Mons, the highest volcano on Mars. The image covers an area of approximately 600 000 sq km and is colour-coded according to height based on data from the DTM. Mars has extraordinary canyons and plains as well as the highest known mountain in the Solar System -- Mons Olympus, an extinct volcano that towers some 27,000 metres (88,500 feet) above the planet's surface. ESA


Lava flows on May 30, 2008 down the Cerro Azul volcano on Isabela Island, the largest of the Galapagos islands, 1,000 km west of Ecuador's coast in the Pacific Ocean. The eruption began on May 29. AFP PHOTO/Parque Nacional Galapagos



A huge cloud of ash spewed from the Chaiten volcano, some 1,300 km south of Santiago is seen from Chaiten, a town where only animals are left after authorities issued a maximum alert and order the evacuation of the area surrounding the volcano which erupted with lava and ash on May 6, 2008. An evacuation of Chaiten in southern Chile had been underway since May 2, after the volcano began erupting for the first time in recent memory, covering the town and surroundings deep in ash. AFP PHOTO/Raul Bravo



A mantle of ash covers Futaleufu, some 170 kilometres from Chaiten, southern Chile on May 7, 2008. A thick cloud of ash from the erupting Chaiten volcano spread across a swathe of South America Wednesday, prompting fears of health crisis for the people caught in its wake. The enormous slow-moving plume was expected to soon reach Buenos Aires, where about eight million people live in the Argentine capital and its surroundings, spreading airborne ash particles which health officials warned could be highly dangerous to inhale. Thousands of Chileans have already fled their homes after the volcano, located 1,300 kilometers (800 miles) south of Santiago near Chile's border with Argentina, erupted violently Tuesday, spewing ash and lava over its surroundings. AFP PHOTO RAUL BRAVO



The Central Square Statue is covered in ashes in Futaleufu in Chile, 10 May 2008. This region was strongly affected by the ashes rain caused by the eruption of the Chaiten volcano about 1,200 kilometers south of Santiago de Chile. EPA/IAN SALAS



A picture taken from a helicopter shows the "mud volcano" in Sidoarjo, East Java on 28 May 2008.Two years after it oozed into life, Indonesia's "mud volcano" is still spewing toxic sludge across the Javanese countryside at the rate of 60 Olympic swimming pools a day. And the more homes and farms that disappear beneath its stinking grey goo, the louder the calls for justice from hundreds of displaced families who are awaiting compensation Indonesia's disastrous mud volcano is collapsing on itself, according to new research released on the second anniversary of the ever-growing environmental catastrophe. Each day, 100,000 cubic metres of hot, stinking sludge continues to ooze from the mystifying mud volcano, which burst through the earth two years ago during deep drilling at a nearby exploratory well, linked to Indonesia's richest man and also part-owned by Australian company Santos. EPA/FULLY HANDOKO



An aerial photograph captures a plume of ashes spewed by the Chaiten volcano near the city of Chaiten, 1,200 km south of Santiago on May 31, 2008.AFP PHOTO / ALVARO VIDAL



A handout photo dated on 03 June 2008 released on 04 June by the Los Lagos Regional Municipality shows the destruction in the Chaiten area, south region of Los Lagos, Chile, after the Chilean Chaiten volcano eruption last 02 May. EPA/CRISTIAN BROWN / LOS LAGOS REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY EDITORIAL USE ONLY



Soputan volcano spews thick smoke and heat clouds in Minahasa on June 6, 2008. A volcano erupted on Indonesia's Sulawesi island on June 6, spewing smoke and sending heat clouds of debris down its slopes, a volcanologist said. Mount Soputan in North Sulawesi started to erupt June 6 at around 9:59 am (0159 GMT), sending heat clouds as far as four kilometres (2.5 miles) and throwing ash two kilometres into the air. AFP PHOTO



Vigorous activity at the Waikupanaha ocean entry continues as a lava bubble bursts in a violent littoral explosion at Waikupanaha, Kalapana, Hawaii, USA, 04 July 2008. This current lava flow has been pouring out of the Pu'u O'o vent since 21 November 2007. EPA/Bruce Omori



A plume of ashes spewed by the Chaiten volcano is seen from the city of Chaiten, 1,200km south from Santiago, Chile on May 2, 2008. About 1,500 people will be evacuated from Chaiten after the volcano erupted. AFP PHOTO ALVARO VIDAL



A photo dated 05 December 2008 shows Mount Semeru spews hot cloud seen from Penanjakan, Probolinggo, East Java, Indonesia. The tallest volcano on Indonesia's Java island has erupted, spewing smoke and ash high into the sky and coating a nearby town in black dust on 06 March 2009, an official says. The 3676-metre Mount Semeru burst into life early in the morning shortly after midnight but officials said it posed no danger to people living in the area, 35km south-east of Lumajang. EPA/ADI WEDA