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Deep sea creatures

01 August 2010 / /

Benthic holothurian (Peniagone porcella) f depth-2500m. These glowing alien-looking creatures are some of ten new species discovered by scientists 12,000ft below the surface of the Atlantic ocean. BrunoPress

Enteropneust (Acorn worm) - Depth approx 2500m BrunoPress

Benthic holothurian (Peniagone diaphana ) depth-2500m BrunoPress

Bathypelagic ctenophore from benthic boundary layer. Found attached to seafloor by adhesive tentacles. BrunoPress

Enteropneust (Acorn worm) - Depth approx 2700m. BrunoPress

A Calamar ( Logio vulgaris ) belonging to the Loliginidae family swims in the depth of Mediterranean sea near the coast of Aydincik in far - eastern Turkey. AFP/Tarik Tinazay

A deep sea jellyfish, Atolla sp, collected with the ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle), from a depth of at least 1500 meters during the marine-life discoveries from the voyage by a joint team of Filipino and American scientists that explored the Celebes Sea. OCEAN GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE/WHOI/EPA

Deep sea animals - sample of zooplankton collected with a Tucker Trawl with a 10m2 opening, jellyfish, a lanternfish, a snipe eel. WHOI/EPA

Originally released by Queensland Brain Institute in 2006 and re-released by the institute in relation to a new phase in their study of deep-sea creatures on July 15, 2010 shows a Peraphilla deep-sea jellyfish at a depth of over 1000 metres at the Osprey Reef in the Coral Sea, some 350kms north-east of the northern Australian city of Cairns. AFP PHOTO/HO/QUEENSLAND BRAIN INSTITUTE/Justin Marshall

A deep-sea anglerfish at a depth of over 1000 metres at the Osprey Reef in the Coral Sea. AFP PHOTO/HO/QUEENSLAND BRAIN INSTITUTE/Justin Marshall

A deep-sea viperfish at a depth of over 1000 metres at the Osprey Reef in the Coral Sea. AFP PHOTO/HO/QUEENSLAND BRAIN INSTITUTE/Justin Marshall

A deep-sea fish at a depth of over 1000 metres at the Osprey Reef in the Coral Sea. AFP PHOTO/HO/QUEENSLAND BRAIN INSTITUTE/Justin Marshall

Sea Pig (sea cucumber or Holothuroid). Sea cucumbers are important in processing the sediment (like earthworms on land) but their numbers worldwide have been threatened by recent fisheries. BrunoPress

Isopod Crustacean, Serolid sp. These animals (woodlice of the sea) appear as though they have been squashed and resemble fossil trilobites. BrunoPress

Newly released pictures reveal the weird and wonderful array of Antarctic marine creatures in one of the fastest warming seas in the world. Peter Bucktrout/BAS /BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS/BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS/BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS/BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS/BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS/BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS/BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS /BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS /BrunoPress

Peter Bucktrout/BAS /BrunoPress